POSSIBLE REVOLUTIONARY SUBSTITUTE TO WHEAT: A REVIEW ON NUTRIENT RICH AND HEALTHY DIET DEVELOPMENT BY PSEUDO CEREALS

Authors

  • A AHMED Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • QUA AKRAM Centre of Agricultural Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • W NAZ Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, University of Punjab Lahore, Pakistan
  • S AKHTAR Vegetable Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • I AMJAD Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • MA ASHRAF Wheat Research Institute, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute, Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • A SHAKEEL Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • A SAEED Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • S SARFRAZ Rice Research Institute, Kala Shah Kaku, Lahore-39018, Pakistan
  • F SHAMIM Rice Research Institute, Kala Shah Kaku, Lahore-39018, Pakistan
  • N SHAHZADI Rice Research Institute, Kala Shah Kaku, Lahore-39018, Pakistan
  • M KASHIF Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • N MAHMOOD Endowment Fund Secretariat, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54112/bcsrj.v2022i1.108

Keywords:

Pseudo cereal, Celiac disease, WDEIA, protein, Buckwheat, Quinoa, Amaranth

Abstract

People of modern age are very health and diet conscious. Various plants have been used as source of nutrition by human beings. Cereals have been one of them. But due to health problems (Celiac disease, WDEIA and baker’s asthma) and allergens present in cereals such as by wheat gluten, people are looking for alternative diet. Population is increasing day by day and to provide them a healthy nutritious diet free of allergens is uphill task. Researchers are looking to exploit various alternative plant sources. Recent findings suggest that pseudo cereals are best alternative to wheat. Buckwheat, Amaranth and Quinoa (pseudo cereals) were underutilized crops. Now, people are gaining more interest in Pseudo cereals for their excellent nutrition profile and gluten free products. They contain essential amino acids, carbohydrates, dietary fibers, minerals, vitamins and other important biological compounds in their nutrition profile. Important biological compounds present in pseudo cereals like phenolics impart beneficial health impacts on human beings. Keeping in view the extra ordinary benefits of consuming pseudo cereals, they must be grown at commercial level. It will make sure availability of diet full of nutrition and free from health risks.

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References

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Published

2022-09-26

How to Cite

AHMED, A., AKRAM, Q., NAZ, W., AKHTAR, S., AMJAD, I. ., ASHRAF, M., SHAKEEL, A., SAEED, A., SARFRAZ, S., SHAMIM, F., SHAHZADI, N., KASHIF, M., & MAHMOOD, N. (2022). POSSIBLE REVOLUTIONARY SUBSTITUTE TO WHEAT: A REVIEW ON NUTRIENT RICH AND HEALTHY DIET DEVELOPMENT BY PSEUDO CEREALS. Biological and Clinical Sciences Research Journal, 2022(1). https://doi.org/10.54112/bcsrj.v2022i1.108

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